Tuesday, April 2, 2013

Deadline Extended to April 22nd: “Call” for Adults Online Proposals by April 10th


Topic for the Standing Group session—title and description of the session below.  If you would like to be considered for a presentation in the session, please send the following information to Sonia Feder-Lewis, sfeder@smumn.edu  as soon as possible and by April 10th [Submission Deadline extended to April 22nd] at the latest, for consideration.  After all the presentations have been received, the officers will discuss them and select the 4 or 5 that will work most effectively as a panel.  The entire application allows for 7000 characters, so please do be concise.

Please submit:
  • Name
  • Title of Presentation
  • Brief description of presentation (one paragraph if possible)
  • Address, affiliation, rank, telephone number, and email address (CCCC proposal requires this information)

Overall Session Title and Description (feedback welcome on this developing proposal!!):

Adults Online:  Welcoming Digital Immigrants to the Land of Online Writing Instruction

As adult learners enter the classroom in ever increasing numbers,  44% of current students in higher education are  now 24 years of age or older (Eduventure, 2007).  Many of these students are now taking classes in online environments.  While the youngest among them may be digital natives, familiar since childhood with technology and the internet, most of these students have crossed the technology border as adults, immigrating into the land of wikis, blogs, chat boxes, bubble comments, podcasts, links, threads, and tweets.  How can we, as teachers, engage these students successfully, and help them acculturate in their new environment, while also bringing them the writing instruction and skills they need to succeed as students and as writers in the diverse roles their complicated lives demand? This session will explore multiple modes of student/student and student/teacher interactions and strategies based on principles of adult learning theory in practice in online composition instruction.


Sunday, March 24, 2013

SIG 2013: Resources on Teaching Veterans as Adult Learners in the Composition Classroom


Dr. Sonia Feder-Lewis
Saint Mary’s University of MN, Twin Cities Campus
sfeder@smumn.edu

Resources on Teaching Veterans as Adult Learners in the Composition Classroom

A  VERY small collection of resources, in an idiosyncratic order, with my “favorites” at the top of each section.  Adult learning theory, from Malcolm Knowles onwards, has emphasized self-directed learning, and drawing on student experience to build student engagement, under the label of Andragogy.  The new term of art, Heutagogy, stresses the idea of self-determined learning, in which the learner not only is responsible for pursuing the learning, but in part designing it as well.  Familiar to those of us who practice critical pedagogy, heutagogy may be particularly relevant to teaching veterans, who may see their educational journey differently.

Relevant Articles on Veterans

Corley, Liam.  (2012).  Reconsiderations: “Brave Words”: Rehabilitating the Veteran-Writer.  College English, 74(4) 351-365.

Fascinating article from a recent College English, written by an Associate Professor of English after his return from mobilization to Afghanistan, as he tries to grapple with his own dislocation from academia and the challenges of re-entry into a now foreign world and discourse.  The article positions him in many ways as an adult learner, reorienting to the milieu from which he has been estranged, and offers a particularly useful insight for us—we can identify with him, yet gain insight into our veteran students.

Special Edition of Teaching English in the Two-Year College:  Four years ago,  in May of 2009,  Teaching English in the Two-Year College devoted a special issue to Teaching English in a Time of War.   A number of articles are relevant to our quest this time, but I will highlight a few that seemed particularly relevant.

Burdick, Melanie.  (2009). Grading the war story.  Teaching English in the Two-Year College, 36(4), 353-354.

Discusses the difficulties we have in providing effective assessment and feedback to students who write about traumatic combat experiences.

Keily, Denis O. & Swift, Lisa. (2009). Casualties of war: Combat trauma and the return of the combat veteran.  Teaching English in the Two-Year College, 36(4), 357-364.

An intriguing reversal of ideas—suggests that combat veterans of today’s wars offer particular and fresh insights into literature of prior wars, specifically in this case The Odyssey. 

Leonhardy, Galen. (2009). Transformations: Working with veterans in the composition classroom. Teaching English in the Two-Year College, 36(4), 339-352.

This article is often cited by others, and presents a very direct experience of a veteran/teacher about his own experience, both as a teacher and a student, in relation to how veterans incorporate their experiences into their writing.  One of the tenets of adult learning theory is that we encourage students to draw upon their life experience, and validate that learning, yet we have to be prepared for what they share, or chose not to share.

Relevant Articles on Andragogy and Heutagogy

Michelson, Elana. (2011). Autobiograpy and self-hood in the practice of adult learning.  Adult Education Quarterly, 61(1), 3-21.

Michelson attends to the practice of having students write autobiographical essays as part of expressing their learning, and the implications for adult learners in the construction of self within these essays.  She argues that rather than necessarily encouraging true reflection and supporting the discovery of learning, teacher and academic cultural expectations of these narratives can be suppressing and rigid, valuing some sorts of narratives over others, and restricting the students to those condoned narratives.  As we consider the narratives of our veterans, this article seems particular poignant.

Blaschke, Lisa Marie.  (2012). Heutagogy and lifelong learning: A review of heutagogical practice and self-determined learning.  International Review of Research in Open and Distance Learning, 13(1), 56-71.

Blaschke reviews the small but growing literature on heutagogy and offers a clear contrast between that and andragogy.  Heutagogy has been seen primarily as a theory belonging in the world of corporate training and education, but as online learning becomes more and more prevalent, the motivation and engagement of learners is becoming more pressing, and the possibility of greater engagement through greater participation in the construction of their learning seems promising.  As student soldiers increasingly take classes between activations and while activated, and veterans access education through online means, their interests may be served here as well.

McAuliffe, Marisha B. and Hargreaves, Douglas J. and Winter, Abigail J. and Chadwick, Gary (2008) Does pedagogy still rule? In: 19th Annual Conference of Australasian Association for Engineer Education, 7-10 December 2008, Central QueenslandUniversity, Yeppoon.

This paper very concisely compares pedagogy (teacher-directed learning), andragogy (student-direct learning) ,and heutagogy (student-determined learning), with very clear explanations. Australia has been the epicenter of heutagogy research.  While this article focuses on engineering education, the definitions are particularly useful and relevant.

Friday, April 13, 2012

Follow Up on 2012 SIG

We enjoyed having time both during the day Friday and well as our SIG time for discussion. We discussed a variety of topics, including working with adults in mixed age classrooms, service learning and adults, our ideas for a reader of students in transition, and veterans as adult learners. We decided that next year's SIG, chaired by Sonia Feder-Lewis, will focus on veterans as adult learners. Sonia will reach out to the Veteran's SIG to see if we might exchange ideas with them. I am taking over the reader project. At the SIG, we discussed what kind of readings work best for adult learners. I've slightly restructured our section on CompFAQs to capture this work. I have consolidated the three different pages we had in the "Reader for People in Transition" section into a new section called "Adult Content: Readings that Work for Adult Students" (http://compfaqs.org/AdultLearners/AdultContentReadingsThatWorkForAdultStudents). My apologies if I did not capture all of your suggestions, but feel free to add those and any additional ideas you have. Thanks, Michelle

Wednesday, April 13, 2011

Following up on 2011 SIG

I've added the material from the SIG here: http://compfaqs.org/AdultLearners/Teaching

I've also taken it and got us started on a wiki workspace here: http://compfaqs.org/AdultLearners/ReaderForPeopleInTransition  

It was wonderful to see everyone who was able to make it to Atlanta. If you could not come this year, we hope to see you in St. Louis next year.

Best,
Michelle

Wednesday, January 26, 2011

Teaching Adult Writers in Diverse Contexts SIG -- Friday, April 8th, 6:30 to 7:30, Atlanta, GA

Hi folks,

Just a reminder to bring your ideas for the ideal composition reader for adult students to Atlanta.  I've copied our proposal below and, if you'd like to get started earlier than April 8th, add your ideas to the blog at http://teachingwritingtoadults.blogspot.com/

Also, please save space in your busy conference schedule for our now traditional post-SIG dinner.

It is 40 degrees in Atlanta today, but I'm counting on balmy weather by April.

Until then, stay warm,

Michelle

Proposal:

Our goal is to outline a composition reader that addresses the interests and needs of adult students and, in the process, explore whether or not it is possible to find common ground for our diverse adult student populations.

At our 2010 SIG, we found ourselves discussing the lack of texts that speak to the concerns, interests and needs of adult composition students. Once we moved from what is not available to what we might create, we found ourselves having to consider whether or not we could create a common text that would appeal to our different adult student populations. For 2011, we plan to run this experiment by assembling an outline for a composition reader for adult students. In the process, we will explore how we define adult students; whether or not these students have enough in common with each other to make such a reader (and our shared assumptions about adult students) viable; and how we might re-think the idea of a reader given the time and financial constraints our students often face, the availability of free online resources, and the increasing importance of multimodal communication. We have begun our exploration at our blog, Teaching Writing to Adults (http://teachingwritingtoadults.blogspot.com/2010/04/preparing-for-2011-sig.html#comments).

Chair: Michelle Navarre Cleary, mnavarr9@depaul.edu
Co-chair: Sonia Feder-Lewis, sfeder@smumn,edu, Topics and Readings
Co-chair: Karen Uehling, kuehling@boisestate.edu, Audience and Previous Publications

Thursday, October 14, 2010

The SIG is on!

I received our acceptance from NCTE earlier this week! I hope to see you all in Atlanta April 6-9, 2011. However, whether you make it there or not, please add your ideas as we try to collaboratively develop a composition reader for adult students.

To get started, please post at least three specific ideas by 12/31/10 of what should go in our reader and why you think it belongs.

Thanks,
Michelle

Here is a copy of our SIG proposal to remind you what we are up to:


Our goal is to outline a composition reader that addresses the interests and needs of adult students and, in the process, explore whether or not it is possible to find common ground for our diverse adult student populations.

At our 2010 SIG, we found ourselves discussing the lack of texts that speak to the concerns, interests and needs of adult composition students. Once we moved from what is not available to what we might create, we found ourselves having to consider whether or not we could create a common text that would appeal to our different adult student populations. For 2011, we plan to run this experiment by assembling an outline for a composition reader for adult students. In the process, we will explore how we define adult students; whether or not these students have enough in common with each other to make such a reader (and our shared assumptions about adult students) viable; and how we might re-think the idea of a reader given the time and financial constraints our students often face, the availability of free online resources, and the increasing importance of multimodal communication. We have begun our exploration at our blog, Teaching Writing to Adults (http://teachingwritingtoadults.blogspot.com/2010/04/preparing-for-2011-sig.html#comments).

Tuesday, April 27, 2010

SIG Proposal -- please send edits by the end of this month


Proposal Number:
140
Type of Session/Proposal:Special Interest Group/Business Meeting
Level Emphasis:all
Interest Emphasis:not applicable
Major Focus:not applicable
Area Cluster:101) Teaching Writing & Rhetoric
Session Title:Teaching Adult Writers in Diverse Settings
Our goal is to outline a composition reader that addresses the interests and needs of adult students and, in the process, explore whether or not it is possible to find common ground for our diverse adult student populations.
Session Description:At our 2010 SIG, we found ourselves discussing the lack of texts that speak to the concerns, interests and needs of adult composition students. Once we moved from what is not available to what we might create, we found ourselves having to consider whether or not we could create a common text that would appeal to our different adult student populations. For 2011, we plan to run this experiment by assembling an outline for a composition reader for adult students. In the process, we will explore how we define adult students; whether or not these students have enough in common with each other to make such a reader (and our shared assumptions about adult students) viable; and how we might re-think the idea of a reader given the time and financial constraints our students often face, the availability of free online resources, and the increasing importance of multimodal communication. We have begun our exploration at our blog, Teaching Writing to Adults (http://teachingwritingtoadults.blogspot.com/2010/04/preparing-for-2011-sig.html#comments).
This presenter has agreed to adapt the presentation for greater accessibility


Participants
Michelle Navarre ClearyChairmnavarr9@depaul.edu
Sonia Feder-LewisCo-Chairsfeder@smumn.edu
Karen UehlingCo-Chairkuehling@boisestate.edu
Michelle Navarre ClearySession Contact Personmnavarr9@depaul.edu